Transforming Classics: 150 Years of Classical Studies in New York

The NYU Center for Ancient Studies and the Society for Classical Studies present Transforming Classics: 150 Years of Classical Studies in New York on November 13, 2018 at Silver Center for Arts and Science, Hemmerdinger Hall, Room 102, 32 Waverly Place, or 31 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003
(Enter at 31 Washington Place for wheelchair access). For more information, the program is available here.

Vergilian Society Tours and Scholarship Information 2019

Would you like to travel abroad? And have help paying for it?

The Vergilian Society is offering exciting study tours in summer 2019 including The Grand Tour on the Bay of Naples; Sicily and Malta; The Roman Rhineland; and Caesar and Vergil in Italy: A Study Tour for Teachers. Morocco is also on offer for winter 2019-20. These programs are specifically designed to benefit and appeal to teachers and students at all levels by providing them the opportunity to experience a rich variety of ancient sites to support their own understanding and teaching of the ancient world. See the full tour descriptions on the Vergilian Society website at www.vergiliansociety.org/tours/2019-tours/

Almost $100,000 in scholarship money is also available: www.vergiliansociety.org/tours/scholarships/

 

Monmouth College 2019 Fox Writing Contest

The Monmouth College Classics Department would like to announce the 2019 Fox Writing Contest for precollegiate students. The theme for this year’s contest will be “A Classical ‘Black Panther.'” There will be a monetary prize for the selected winner. Information and guidelines are noted on the flyer, available here. Any questions can be directed to Dr. Robert Simmons at rsimmons@monmouthcollege.edu.

 

Call For Papers: NeMLA 2019

Panel 1: Reading and Writing the Classics in Antiquity and Beyond
NeMLA 2019, March 21-24 in Washington, D.C. 
Chair: Claire Sommers, csommers@gc.cuny.edu
Abstracts Due: September 30, 2018
 

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has survived for thousands of years. As a result, Classical literary and philosophical works have served as a profound influence on the writings of subsequent time periods. Indeed, in many subsequent time periods, the ability to quote from Classical sources became a marker of status and intelligence. However, many works of ancient Greece and Rome are not wholly original, but in fact flaunt their use of source materials, citing earlier versions of myths and epics. Often, Classical and post-Classical authors would modify their source materials, and we are able to see them not only as writers, but as readers in their own right.

This panel will explore the use of ancient sources in Classical literature and its descendants. We will examine how Classical works engage with previous sources and how ancient works of literature and philosophy became important source materials in subsequent time periods. Possible approaches include:

· Allusions to other ancient sources in Classical literature and philosophy

· The use of Classical works in the texts of later time periods

· Alterations and revisions that are made to Classical sources

· The overlap between writer and reader in the use of Classical sources

· The status of Classical sources throughout the ages

· The use of satire and/or parody to engage with the Classics

· Classical texts and the creation of new genres

Please submit a 300 word abstract and 100 word bio by September 30, 2018. You will need to create an user account through the NeMLA account in order to submit an abstract. Contact Claire Sommers (csommers@gc.cuny.edu) with any questions.

Panel 2: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process
NeMLA 2019, March 21-24 in Washington, D.C. 
Chair: Claire Sommers, csommers@gc.cuny.edu
Abstracts Due: September 30, 2018
 

Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

This panel session will explore how ancient art, literature, and philosophy utilize metanarrative and meditate upon the act of creation, and how it serves as a means of examining the creative process in subsequent time periods. Possible approaches include:

· Classical reflections on their own genres and media

· Classical critiques of sources

· Metanarratives in Classical texts

· Classical theories of aesthetics and their influence

· Discussions of contemporaneous art, music, literature, and drama in Classical literature

· The use of Classical sources in subsequent literature as a means of reflection

Please submit a 300 word abstract and 100 word bio by September 30, 2018. You will need to create an user account through the NeMLA account in order to submit an abstract. Contact Claire Sommers (csommers@gc.cuny.edu) with any questions.

SCS Coffin Fellowship for Secondary School Teachers

The David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship, offered by the Society for Classical Studies, provides funding to secondary school teachers so that they can travel abroad.  Funding can be used as partial support for many different summer programs.  This year’s deadline for applications is February 28.  For more details, see:

https://classicalstudies.org/awards-and-fellowships/david-d-and-rosemary-h-coffin-fellowship-travel-classical-lands

All secondary teachers considering summer travel are encouraged to apply.

Teaching Leaders and Leadership Through the Classics: a Virtual Conference

Register now for the virtual conference/course “Teaching Leaders and Leadership Through the Classics,” held from May 8-22, 2017.

This conference explores how the study of classical antiquity has been, can be, and should be used as a platform for leadership education in the 21st century.  The primary texts and artifacts we study are often about, for, or by the leaders of their times; they then were, and still are, received, adapted, and used by people of later eras in developing new leaders. Our discipline’s emphasis on textual and visual analysis, narrative, and cultural history aids students in developing the skills of empathy, contextual intelligence, and critical thinking that are the most essential for the success of leaders in any field. As universities place greater and greater emphasis on their mission to develop students as future leaders, the field of Classics can become central to the study of leadership and the education of leaders.

For more information and registration, visit the conference website: https://teachingleadershipthruclassics.wordpress.com/

NYU Center for Ancient Studies – Spring 2017 conference

The NYU Center for Ancient Studies and The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, in conjunction with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, will present a symposium on “The Age of Empires: Comparisons and Interactions between East and West in Antiquity,” on April 6, 7, & 9, 2017.  It will take place in The Met’s Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium.  This program is offered in association with the exhibition, “Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 B.C. – A.D. 220),” at The Met. Information for the conference can be found on this poster. The full program may be viewed here:

http://ancientstudies.fas.nyu.edu/object/Spring_2017_Age_of_Empires_Conference.html

SALVI 2017 Programs: Registration Now!

Registration for the North American Institute of Living Latin Studies (SALVI) summer Latin immersion programs is now open.  Summer 2017 will feature Rusticatio Tironum (June 30-July 6) led by John Kuhner, Rusticatio Omnibus (July 7-13) led by Nancy Llewellyn, and Rusticatio Veteranorum (July 18-24) led by Justin Bailey.  SALVI is also hosting weekend Latin immersion programs: look for one in your area!  Please visit our event page for more information.

Euripides Helen at Montclair State University

Montclair State University’s Classics and General Humanities Department will  sponsor a series of four outdoors performances of Euripides’ HELEN this  coming spring, April 20, 21, 25, and 27, 2017, in the Greek-style Amphitheater on MSU’s campus,  adjacent to Kasser Theater. Performances are free and open to the  public, and will take place at 2pm on each of the performance days. For more information, see: www.msuhelen.org. For other theater productions, see our general website: www.msugreekplays.org, and/or contact Jeri (Dr. Jerise Fogel) at fogelj@montclair.edu